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The Importance of Diet


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Adopting a healthy, balanced diet can begin to eliminate many of the problems associated with waste accumulation in the body. It also provides adequate nutrients essential to the body’s balanced equilibrium. The role of the digestive system is to bring food in, break it down into useable energy via nutrient absorption, and dispose of wastes that cannot be efficiently used. The higher the quality of food we eat, the more nutrients and energy we obtain from it.

Mitigating the Effects of Toxic Overload

We are exposed daily to both environmental toxins and food byproducts accumulated through diet. As we ingest nonuseable chemicals contained in foods, such as hormones, pesticides, antibiotic residues, and other compounds, our body must work extra hard to digest these foreign substances in addition to obtaining nutrients from the same foods. The liver and kidneys, which are responsible for metabolizing toxic compounds, must work at breaking down toxins from our environment, our food, and our own metabolic processes. The human body is not 100 percent efficient as it performs metabolism. It tends to make wastes, endogenous toxins that need to be processed and excreted from the body. The efficiency with which a person’s body excretes these cumulative wastes determines his or her “terrain” (the body’s susceptibility to disease due to its biochemical and energetic environment). As this implies, different individuals have different terrains. In addition to environmental and dietary toxins, pharmaceutical drugs are another source of outside toxins. Again, the liver and kidneys are mainly responsible for catabolizing (breaking down) and excreting these toxins. Finally, in addition to having to metabolize toxins and wastes, the body must be able to digest and break down airborne and food-borne allergens. Does it make sense that we overload our systems by accumulating more toxins? Does it also make sense that reducing dietary toxins can enhance how effectively we eliminate the remaining ones? Here is an analogy to help you understand the body’s capacity for stress, toxins, allergens, and metabolic wastes and how they could relate to your diet. Imagine you have a cup that holds eight fluid ounces. This cup symbolizes your potential toxin and allergen intake. If you fill the cup with six ounces of food allergies, you can take in only two more ounces before the cup overflows and you can no longer deal with the toxins. If you are then exposed to environmental toxins, pollens in the springtime, and pharmaceutical drugs, your cup cannot handle all of the insults to your system. As your cup overflows, you may experience pain, runny nose, postnasal drip, cough, rash, fatigue, and many other symptoms (discussed later in the section on food allergy). On the other hand, if you remove the six ounces of food allergies, you have an increased ability to take in and process toxins and allergens that cannot be avoided. For example, patients who are extremely allergic to grass and pollen cannot remove all of the grass and pollen from their lives, but they can decrease their food allergies to allow their body to better process grass and pollens.


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