Advertisement

The Importance of Diet


Advertisement

You Really Are What You Eat

The most important part of my practice in the development of a treatment plan with my patients is diet. You have probably heard the phrase “you are what you eat” a million times throughout your life. Have you ever stopped to think of what the phrase means or why it has become such a popular cliché? Laws of physics state that every object or being can be broken down into smaller and smaller molecules. The smallest part that makes up any object or being is energy. Because all objects are made of energy, we can deduce that human beings are made wholly of energy. This also means that all food is energy. If we stopped eating energy-giving foods to fuel our body processes, we could not live for very long. That said, doesn’t it make sense to pay attention to what we consume each day? The food we eat is the fuel for all bodily processes. If you value your car and want it to run at its optimal level, wouldn’t you put the bestquality gas and oil into it? Likewise, if you value your body (and, accordingly, your health and your life), isn’t it time to put the best-quality food or “fuel” into it? Just as different objects have varying energy composition, different foods also have varying energies. We need to pay attention to the quality of food we put into our bodies. Food that is organically grown, is freshly picked, and has spent the least amount of time in transport has the most vitality and therefore will offer you the highest-quality energy and nutrients. The more processing a food undergoes, the more toxins and the less energy and nutrient value it holds. Here’s general rule to remember: If you can’t tell what a food is by looking at it, don’t eat it. For example, white bread is made from wheat, but does it look like wheat? Can you tell it was made from wheat? Then you probably should not eat it. Eating foods that are locally produced and in season is a great way to ensure good quality and good vitality. Foods that have been dehydrated, boxed for weeks or sometimes months, or canned in aluminum may be devoid of energy and full of preservatives, additives, and possibly dyes. These processed food items may offer a significantly reduced amount of nutrients compared with fresh foods. We can obtain some vital micronutrients (vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals), which are used to support metabolism and energy, through supplementation, but the macronutrients needed for the body’s fuel (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) can only come from food. Because the food we eat is our only source of fuel, we really are what we eat. Eating food out of cans day after day may leave a person feeling fatigued and devoid of energy, similar to the energy of the food he or she is consuming.


Advertisement

SHARE


Advertisement

2 of 6
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse